Home » Current Affairs » Exposure to outdoor light reduces risk of short-sightedness in kids

Exposure to outdoor light reduces risk of short-sightedness in kids

Increase in the exposure of the outdoor light reduces the chances of short-sightedness in kids. (Image Courtesy: Google)

There has been increasing spending of time by the current individuals over their laptops or desktops and being more busy with their hectic schedule. Thus these people are not being able to get sufficient amount of the outdoor light during their daytime. This factor of being exposed to the outdoor light is being found to be the reason for causing the short-sightedness which is quite prevalent nowadays and not the higher exposure of the laptop screens.

Increasing exposure to outdoor light is the key to reducing the short-sightedness epidemic in children, according to ground-breaking research. (Image Courtesy: Google)
Increasing exposure to outdoor light is the key to reducing the short-sightedness epidemic in children, according to ground-breaking research. (Image Courtesy: Google)

Research Basics

Optometrist and also the lead researcher of the study, Associate Professor Scott Read who is also a director of research at the Qut’s School of Optometry and Vision Science, says that the current children’s are required to spend more time for the outdoor light and environment. This will be helping them greatly for preventing myopia from being developing and even progressing.

Speaking at the Australian Vision Convention in Queensland over the weekend, he says that not the long exposure of the screens that is being causing the myopia but lack of the outdoor light is causing it. Though the screens are the reasons for the children’s spending more time indoors but it is not the cause being responsible for the myopia. It is being predicted that those who already have a myopia is likely to reduce the progression if they increase their time outside.

Increasing prevalence of Myopia

Optometry Australia President Kate Gifford further adding over the same says that this study is of particular importance in explaining the increasing prevalence of the myopia in children’s. It was being announced in February that half of the world’s population children is going to be short sighted by 2050 and many of them are also having the risk of getting blind.

The global study being conducted and published in Brien Holden Vision Institute is forecasting that around 10 percent of the world population is having the risk of getting blind by 2050 if proper steps are not being taken for turning down the myopia.

The QUT study carried out their findings by measuring the eye growth by making them wearing the wrist watch light sensors for recording the light exposure and the physical activity for a fortnight during the warmer than the colder months for giving an overall measurement of the typical light exposure. Professor Read further adding says, “Children exposed to the least outdoor light had faster eye growth and hence faster myopia progression,”

Leave a Reply