Home » Health » Food » Artificial Sweeteners Not The Best Way To Control Obesity?

Artificial Sweeteners Not The Best Way To Control Obesity?

The study published in the journal Cell Metabolism suggests that artificial sweeteners can make one feel hungry, which can result in overeating.
The study published in the journal Cell Metabolism suggests that artificial sweeteners can make one feel hungry, which can result in overeating.

This is the first study to identify how artificial sweeteners can stimulate appetite, with researchers identifying a complex neuronal network that responds to artificially sweetened food by telling the animal it hasn’t eaten enough energy.

People suffering from obesity or diabetes are often prescribed artificial sweeteners to enjoy their food or beverages without worrying about blood sugar levels.

A recent study has however challenged the functioning of artificial sweeteners.

The study published in the journal Cell Metabolism suggests that artificial sweeteners can make one feel hungry, which can result in overeating.

These sweeteners are consumes by millions of people worldwide and they are prescribed as a tool to treat obesity.

The study co-led by the University of Sydney has shed some light on the effects of artificial sweeteners on the brain in regulating appetite and in altering taste perceptions.

Researchers from the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre and the Garvan Institute of Medical Research have identified a new system in the brain that senses and integrates the sweetness and energy content of food.

The Study on Artificial Sweeteners:

In the study, fruit flies that were exposed to a diet laced with artificial sweetener for prolonged periods (more than five days) were found to consume 30 percent more calories when they were then given naturally sweetened food.

This is the first study to identify how artificial sweeteners can stimulate appetite, with researchers identifying a complex neuronal network that responds to artificially sweetened food by telling the animal it hasn’t eaten enough energy.

The researchers also found artificial sweeteners promoted hyperactivity, insomnia and decreased sleep quality — behaviours consistent with a mild starvation or fasting state — with similar effects on sleep also previously reported in human studies.

To discover whether artificial sweeteners also increased food intake in mammals, Professor Herbert Herzog’s lab from Garvan then replicated the study using mice.

Again the mice that consumed a sucralose-sweetened diet for seven days displayed a significant increase in food consumption, and the neuronal pathway involved was the same as in the fruit flies.

Leave a Reply